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Posts Tagged ‘molded case circuit breakers’

Circuit Breakers: We’ve got what you need – All Manufacturer’s

February 23rd, 2015 No comments

Circuit Breakers: We’ve got what you need.  MIDWEST sells reconditioned, used and new Circuit Breakers.  Call today at 800.803.9256!   http://www.swgr.com/store/circuit-breakers/molded-case/home.aspx

All manufacturer’s available – Cutler Hammer, General Electric, ITE, Siemens, Square D, Westinghouse, ABB, Airpax, Allen Bradley, American, ASEA Brown Boveri, Bryat, Bulldog, Challenger, Crouse Hinds, Federal Pacific, Fuji, Gould, Heineman, Kraus Naimer, Merlin Gerin, Milbank, Mitsubishi, Moeller, Murray, National, Sace, Sylvania, Telmand, Thomas and Betts, Trumbull, Tyco, Vois Worth, Wadsworth, Zinsco, etc.

Image of Circuit Breaker Main and Arcing Contacts

July 9th, 2012 No comments

 

Circuit Breaker Main and Arcing Contacts with Copper Splatter

Circuit Breaker Main and Arcing Contacts with Copper Splatter

When discussing circuit breakers, we like to have good images to show the difference between the main contacts and the arcing contacts. When a circuit breaker opens, the main contacts should open partially first before the arcing contacts start to open. There should be no arcing damage to the main contacts because the arc interruption takes place between the arcing contacts. This protects the current carrying surfaces of the main contacts so there is minimum contact resistance at the main contacts. Good contact surface means no overheating. For the same reason, when the circuit breaker closes, the arcing contacts close first, suffering any arcing damage. After the arcing contacts are closed, the main contacts close. All this keeps the main contacts in good condition. The arcing contacts are enclosed in something called an arc chute that extends and separates the arc until it is extinguished when the circuit breaker opens. When the arc chutes are contaminated with dirt or high humidity or interrupt very high loads or fault currents, the arc chutes take a beating. Whether you’re talking about Square D circuit breakers, Cutler Hammer circuit breakers, Siemens, Westinghouse or GE General Electric circuit breakers, molded case circuit breakers, power circuit breakers, or medium voltage air circuit breakers, the function of the arc chutes is the same, take a beating to protect the main breakers. The attached image shows the damage to the stationary and movable arcing contacts and to the arc runner that extends into the arc chutes to extend and divide the arc until it is extinguished. The main contacts, the 16 curved segments across the middle of the image, are in good shape. No arcing damage what so ever. This image is from a medium voltage air circuit breaker.

Circuit Breaker Reset Tests

January 11th, 2012 No comments
1600 Amp General Electric Air Circuit Breaker - Catalog No. AK-2A-50-1

1600 Amp General Electric Air Circuit Breaker – Catalog No. AK-2A-50-1 Available at www.swgr.com

A customer called MIDWEST to ask why we did something called a “Reset Test” on his circuit breaker. He said he has had circuit breakers tested by switchgear service companies for nearly 30 years and never ever saw something called a circuit breaker “Reset Test.” He has Square D circuit breakers, Westinghouse circuit breakers, General Electrical circuit breakers and newer Cutler Hammer circuit breakers. He checked some of his old test reports and found no “reset tests.”  He had never used MIDWEST before, so he was pretty interested when we explained the reason and procedure for the reset test. The reason was a very pleasant surprise because it gave him greater confidence in the proper performance of his circuit breakers.  MIDWEST started using the circuit breaker “reset test” many years ago. It’s not a standard test procedure. You won’t find it in the text books or instruction manuals. You will find it in MIDWEST’s Training Manual under ‘Scars,’ meaning experience. It’s a carry over procedure from testing old dashpot type air circuit breakers and insulated case circuit breakers and molded case circuit breakers. The reason for the test is that occasionally, seldom but occasionally, a circuit breaker will nuisance trip when put back into service after it has been high current tested. For example, a 1600 amp air circuit breaker, after high current testing, might nuisance trip instantly at 500 amps.  Basically the over current device failed during the high current testing. This was far more common with older “non electronic” over current devices. New electronic over current devices are more reliable, but not perfect. Strange things happen. We are not talking about the service technician forgetting to put the settings back to the correct positions. We are talking about an actual defective device. The test only takes moments. In the interest of quality control, the reset test addresses the “consequences of failure” as opposed to the “probability of failure.”

Yes, we are paranoid about safety and quality.

Circuit Breaker Large Over Current Time Delays

December 29th, 2010 4 comments

In MIDWEST’s training classes for qualified personnel, there is a segment where we explain the long time delay range within which a Square D 1000 amp circuit breaker should trip due to an overload. This information is received with anything from amazement to skepticism to outright disbelief, even though we show the Square D circuit breaker characteristic trip curve.  The overload time delay information is not restricted to Square D circuit breakers. It’s the same with Cutler Hammer, GE General Electric, Siemens, ITE, Westinghouse, Merlin Gerin, or Federal Pacific circuit breakers.

 

In our training example we use an old Square D 1000 amp MA type circuit breaker.  If we tested this circuit breaker at 3000 amps, that’s 300%, the minimum to maximum trip range is about 45 seconds to 340 seconds. It might trip in 45 seconds or it might not trip for 340 seconds.  This is an old thermo-magnetic circuit breaker, which typically works by heating a bi-metal in the over current trip device. Many newer breakers use electronic over current devices which have more repeatable overload time delay test results.

 

The illusion is that these Square D, Cutler Hammer, Westinghouse circuit breakers are designed to directly protect people. They are not. The breakers protect the equipment connected to them and they protect the electrical system. They are designed for the characteristics of the equipment connected, such that connected equipment will not be damaged by an overload or fault. This is a basic limited explanation. So, when you think of molded case circuit breakers, power circuit breakers or air circuit breakers, it’s important to know these breakers don’t just trip right at the breaker trip device rating.