Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Over Current Device’

Circuit Breaker Reset Tests

January 11th, 2012 Comments off
1600 Amp General Electric Air Circuit Breaker - Catalog No. AK-2A-50-1

1600 Amp General Electric Air Circuit Breaker – Catalog No. AK-2A-50-1 Available at www.swgr.com

A customer called MIDWEST to ask why we did something called a “Reset Test” on his circuit breaker. He said he has had circuit breakers tested by switchgear service companies for nearly 30 years and never ever saw something called a circuit breaker “Reset Test.” He has Square D circuit breakers, Westinghouse circuit breakers, General Electrical circuit breakers and newer Cutler Hammer circuit breakers. He checked some of his old test reports and found no “reset tests.”  He had never used MIDWEST before, so he was pretty interested when we explained the reason and procedure for the reset test. The reason was a very pleasant surprise because it gave him greater confidence in the proper performance of his circuit breakers.  MIDWEST started using the circuit breaker “reset test” many years ago. It’s not a standard test procedure. You won’t find it in the text books or instruction manuals. You will find it in MIDWEST’s Training Manual under ‘Scars,’ meaning experience. It’s a carry over procedure from testing old dashpot type air circuit breakers and insulated case circuit breakers and molded case circuit breakers. The reason for the test is that occasionally, seldom but occasionally, a circuit breaker will nuisance trip when put back into service after it has been high current tested. For example, a 1600 amp air circuit breaker, after high current testing, might nuisance trip instantly at 500 amps.  Basically the over current device failed during the high current testing. This was far more common with older “non electronic” over current devices. New electronic over current devices are more reliable, but not perfect. Strange things happen. We are not talking about the service technician forgetting to put the settings back to the correct positions. We are talking about an actual defective device. The test only takes moments. In the interest of quality control, the reset test addresses the “consequences of failure” as opposed to the “probability of failure.”

Yes, we are paranoid about safety and quality.

Noisy Circuit Breaker is a Warning

August 12th, 2011 1 comment
HKD3400F Westinghouse 400 Amp Circuit Breakers For Sale at www.swgr.com

HKD3400F Westinghouse 400 Amp Circuit Breakers For Sale at www.swgr.com

A contractor called MIDWEST for a little free advice. His customer had a 400 amp molded case circuit breaker. This happened to be a 400 amp Westinghouse circuit breaker, but it could just as well have been Square D or General Electric. He was very worried because his customer’s 400 amp circuit breaker was rattling, making a terrible humming and rattling noise. He had never heard this before and didn’t know if the circuit breaker was going to blow up, fall apart or what. He said this was a very old breaker, 1960s. We recommended he measure the load on the feeder cables from the breaker, but to do this very safely. Measure the current at the load end of the feeder, if possible, not at the circuit breaker. It is not totally unusual for an old circuit breaker to rattle and hum away when the load is near or over the rating of the over current device. When the breaker’s internal over current device is picking up because of the load. It depends on the breaker. The noise might be an indication the over current device is picking up and may trip the circuit breaker if the load doesn’t drop down below pickup soon enough. Either way, it may be a good idea to replace the circuit breaker. Sometimes these breakers will nuisance trip at less than the pickup current level. If possible retrofit the old circuit breaker with a newer replacement model. Sometimes the rattling is from the metal arc dividers in the circuit breaker arc chutes. Either way, it is not a noise you want to hear. Check the load. If that is not the problem, change the circuit breaker. Safely.