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Posts Tagged ‘Siemens’

Circuit Breakers: We’ve got what you need – All Manufacturer’s

February 23rd, 2015 No comments

Circuit Breakers: We’ve got what you need.  MIDWEST sells reconditioned, used and new Circuit Breakers.  Call today at 800.803.9256!   http://www.swgr.com/store/circuit-breakers/molded-case/home.aspx

All manufacturer’s available – Cutler Hammer, General Electric, ITE, Siemens, Square D, Westinghouse, ABB, Airpax, Allen Bradley, American, ASEA Brown Boveri, Bryat, Bulldog, Challenger, Crouse Hinds, Federal Pacific, Fuji, Gould, Heineman, Kraus Naimer, Merlin Gerin, Milbank, Mitsubishi, Moeller, Murray, National, Sace, Sylvania, Telmand, Thomas and Betts, Trumbull, Tyco, Vois Worth, Wadsworth, Zinsco, etc.

Image of Circuit Breaker Main and Arcing Contacts

July 9th, 2012 No comments

 

Circuit Breaker Main and Arcing Contacts with Copper Splatter

Circuit Breaker Main and Arcing Contacts with Copper Splatter

When discussing circuit breakers, we like to have good images to show the difference between the main contacts and the arcing contacts. When a circuit breaker opens, the main contacts should open partially first before the arcing contacts start to open. There should be no arcing damage to the main contacts because the arc interruption takes place between the arcing contacts. This protects the current carrying surfaces of the main contacts so there is minimum contact resistance at the main contacts. Good contact surface means no overheating. For the same reason, when the circuit breaker closes, the arcing contacts close first, suffering any arcing damage. After the arcing contacts are closed, the main contacts close. All this keeps the main contacts in good condition. The arcing contacts are enclosed in something called an arc chute that extends and separates the arc until it is extinguished when the circuit breaker opens. When the arc chutes are contaminated with dirt or high humidity or interrupt very high loads or fault currents, the arc chutes take a beating. Whether you’re talking about Square D circuit breakers, Cutler Hammer circuit breakers, Siemens, Westinghouse or GE General Electric circuit breakers, molded case circuit breakers, power circuit breakers, or medium voltage air circuit breakers, the function of the arc chutes is the same, take a beating to protect the main breakers. The attached image shows the damage to the stationary and movable arcing contacts and to the arc runner that extends into the arc chutes to extend and divide the arc until it is extinguished. The main contacts, the 16 curved segments across the middle of the image, are in good shape. No arcing damage what so ever. This image is from a medium voltage air circuit breaker.

Seeing Is Not Believing – Barrels of Junk Circuit Breakers

March 12th, 2012 No comments
Barrel of Scrap Circuit Breakers

Barrel of Scrap Circuit Breakers

This is another blog on MIDWEST’s barrels of junk circuit breakers. More specifically it is about the difficulty of not believing something you can’t see. This human factor can frequently be a challenge in our world when a customer has a perfectly good looking circuit breaker and we tell them it is no good and they need a replacement circuit breaker that will cost $3500.00. They understand the words, but their emotional pocket book says “But it looks okay.” Even after being presented with the test results or pictures of the inside of the breaker that reveal the deficiency or damage, they find it hard to believe what their brain is telling them isn’t true, “Because it looks okay.” In our world of reconditioning circuit breakers and remanufacturing circuit breakers, we frequently scrap out equipment that looks in perfectly good condition. Usually the reason for tossing out, say a Square D NA361200circuit breaker, involves deficiencies that can not

Square D NA361200 Circuit Breaker

Square D NA361200 Circuit Breaker

be seen physically, unless you remove the cover or thoroughly test the circuit breaker. Whether a reconditioned GE General Electric, Square D, Cutler Hammer or Siemens circuit breaker, if the inspection or test results say junk, out it goes. And keep in mind, some circuit breakers are not built to be happy if you remove the cover. You need to know what you’re doing. Recently we had an electrical contractor stop to pick up several reconditioned Cutler Hammer circuit breakers. He walked by the barrels labeled “Scrap Breakers” and he looked like he saw a little gold mine. He really didn’t like the idea that all those breakers were actually junk and were being scrapped. The contractor in him told him these breakers were worth a fortune. Even after showing him some of the new looking circuit breakers that had the covers off revealing visible deficiencies, all he could say was a skeptical “Hmmm.”  Even we sometimes grunt a little “Hmmm” when we toss out a $3000.00 piece of junk.

Removing Cover from an Energized Breaker

November 19th, 2010 No comments

 

MIDWEST had a customer call and ask if it was okay to remove the cover from an old 400 amp circuit breaker, live. Our Infrared Scan indicated the load side connection was overheating. They wanted to repair it, but didn’t want to turn the power off to the whole panel board. They needed to remove the cover of the circuit breaker to make the repair and thought they could just remove the four screws holding the cover on and carefully remove the cover. We explained politely that they were crazy to try such a thing. This was an old molded case circuit breaker and the arc chutes for this breaker were not fastened in place as they are in some breakers. In addition, the arc dividers were metal and they were held together with an insulated band. On some of these breakers we have to tape the band to hold the arc dividers together or they just fall apart. So the danger would be that you remove the cover with the line side still hot and one of the arc chutes falls out and the metal arc dividers fall apart. It would be almost certain that one of the metal arc dividers would short a stationary contact to a moveable contact and cause a horrific arcing blast, arcing fault.  Depending on the instantaneous, ie fault, setting of the main breaker, the fault might last for seconds and result in tremendous damage to the equipment and expose anyone nearby to serious injury or death from an arc blast. Because the fault is on the line side of the breaker, it wouldn’t take much to create a panel board bus fault. This is a good way to get someone seriously injured or killed and a good way to destroy a whole panel board. To remove the cover off any circuit breaker with the line side hot is a very bad idea. But to remove the cover of some of the older circuit breakers, with the line side hot, is just crazy because of the construction of the breaker. Inside molded case circuit breakers there are other devices that may fall out when you remove the cover. Besides all this, there may be something defective inside the breaker, just waiting there, for the first unfortunate person to take the cover off, and then it falls apart or breaks completely. You could get very unlucky. We call these things incipient failures and they can be some of the most nasty and dangerous defects in electrical equipment, because you are not expecting them. This is true whether it’s a Square D, Cutler Hammer, Westinghouse, GE General Electric, or Siemens circuit breaker or any other breaker manufacturer. Turn the main power off!

Circuit Breaker Infrared Scanning Disagreement – Lugs

October 27th, 2010 No comments

Infrared Scan of a Circuit BreakerWe read about a disagreement between two bloggers over whether or not infrared scanning, or thermography, was needed if you torque tightened the wire connections to power circuit breaker terminals during routine maintenance.  What occurred to MIDWEST were all the possible deficiencies we find in old, new, and replacement circuit breakers, using infrared scanning, that have nothing to do with whether or not the load terminals were tight.  One of the nasty deficiencies is when the cable lug in an old circuit breaker is very tight, but the lug is overheating because the screw, holding the lug to the breaker output tab, is loose. We’ve seen brand new circuit breakers and replacement circuit breakers fry the load side tab of the breaker so bad that the breaker had to be replaced. This is true for new or old Square D, GE General Electric, Westinghouse, Siemens, Cutler Hammer, ABB, any manufacturer. It has nothing to do with a specific circuit breaker manufacturer.

 

Sometimes the lug is welded to the tab from the arcing between the lug and tab. There is a very sophisticated test one can perform during a maintenance outage to check for this defect. First, check for voltage at the load and line side of the de-energized circuit breakers. Don’t care that the main breaker is off and all the feeder breakers are open.  Check voltage anyway.  You are checking for something that shouldn’t be, not for something you know should be.  We, rather I, have personal experience with getting my hand blasted because a breaker was back fed. Very bizarre set up, unbelievable, just waiting to injure someone.

 

After checking for voltage, carefully and gently try to move the conductor coming out of each phase of each circuit breaker.  You are trying to see if the cable is loose in the lug and you are trying to see if the lug is loose, moves or turns, in the circuit breaker. You are not trying to force it to move. Just use enough force to see if it is loose in the circuit breaker. If the lug itself is loose, the cable or cables will need to be removed from the lug; The mounting screw for the lug properly tightened; The cables properly reinstalled; And the cables tightened in the lug. Again, don’t be too forceful. On small breakers, you can always make the lug move. Repeating, you just want to use enough force to see if the lugs for that old obsolete circuit breaker are loose.

 

If the conductive interface, between the lug and the circuit breaker, is damaged from severe overheating or arcing, the defective circuit breaker may need to be replaced. Sometimes the damaged area can be repaired.  MIDWEST does not recommend replacing power circuit breakers while the switchboard is energized. Be safe. Turn things off. Check for voltage everywhere.